The Great Whin Sill

One of the most prominent features of the Northumberland scenery is known as the Whin Sill. This is an igneous intrusion, meaning that motlen rock was injected into rock which already existed, mostly following the preexisting weaknesses in the older rock.

The Whin Sill exposed as a headland on the Northumberland Coast
The Whin Sill exposed as a headland on the Northumberland Coast

In the case of the photo above the headland is made of the harder Whin Sill (dolerite), compared to the sedimentary  rocks around it. This contrast in resistance to the elements has resulted in the sediments being eroded much quicker, and the formation of the bay that we observe today!

The Whin Sill outcrops across large areas of Northumberland, forming the popular climbing areas of  Peel Crag and Crag Lough, located just below Hadrian’s wall.

Peel Crag, Northumberland, UK
Peel Crag, Northumberland, UK

UKC Logbook pages: Peel Crag and Crag Lough

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